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Friday, 9 November 2012

Walsh, John Edwards





Private John Edwards Walsh

was born in Ramelton, Co. Donegal on 25th November 1888 probably in the family home at Hollymount, Rathmullen.  His parents Thomas Leord Walsh (b. 1853) and Mrs Jane Noble Walsh (nee Edwards, - b. 1854 d. 1939).  They were of Presbyterian faith.

John was christened in Ramelton.

On 13th March 1906 John joined Northern Bank at Head Office.  Transfers followed to Bailieborough (1906) and Head Office (1912).

By 1911, Walsh was boarding in house 68, Bailieborough Town, Bailieborough, Co. Cavan.  He is described as a Bank Official.  [The record has been transcribed with the surname as Edmond Walsh].

Whilst based in Head Office, Aged 25, Walsh volunteered and enlisted into the 14th Bn. Royal Irish Rifles for the duration of the war.  The 14th battalion was known as the YCV - Young Citizen Volunteers.  His Service Number was 14/16078.

Walsh served as a sniper in the British Expeditionary Force in 1915.  Service was seen in the Somme 1916 (Thiepval), Messines 1917 and Ypres 1917.

Walsh was injured twice by gunshot wounds.  After his injuries, he refused several times to have his leg amputated.

Demobilisation came in June 1918.  As he had been injured, Walsh was awarded the Silver War Badge (number 423, 212).  The following ledger image records the issue of this badge.



Silver War Badge Register (courtesy of Nigel Henderson)


He was also awarded the 1914/15 Star, the British Victory Medal and the British War Medal.  The following two images are the official Medal Index Cards for John E Walsh.

Card 1 indicates that Walsh qualified for the 1915 Star on 6th October 1915 and that he served in France.


Medal Index Card 1 (courtesy of Nigel Henderson)


Card 2 indicates that Walsh enlisted on 12th September 1914 and was discharged (as wounded) on 26th June 1918.


Medal Index Card 2  (courtesy of Nigel Henderson)


Following his discharge, there was a period of just over 1 year before Walsh rejoined the Northern Bank on 16th July 1919 at Head Office. He may have spent this period in hospital recuperating from his injuries.  Transfers followed to Royal Avenue (1928) and Claudy – manager (1941).

John lived at 36 Brookvale Avenue, Antrim Road, Belfast and worshipped in Duncairn Presbyterian Church.  His name is detailed on their Roll of Honour.  This tablet is framed in oak and contains the names of 192 men who enlisted and served in the forces.  As the church has closed and is now an arts centre, the tablet is now entrusted to the Somme Museum, Conlig, Bangor.  Two images at the bottom of this page are an article from the Northern Whig dated 2nd May 1921.



Duncairn Presbyterian Church Roll of Honour  (courtesy of Nigel Henderson)


At one stage he joined the Commercial Boat Club and with his team mates won the Connor Cup for rowing.

In August 1929 he married Miss Vida Caroline Mayrs of 113 Albertbridge Road, Belfast.  The 1911 Irish Census describes this property as house 113.1.

The Staff Magazine ‘The Link (August 1980)’ contains a photograph of Walsh in Royal Avenue branch in 1930.

Walsh died in 1973.

John Edwards Walsh has been added to the Northern Bank War Memorials community on the Imperial War Museum (IWM) Lives of the First World War website.

Walsh's daughter, Mrs Pat Taylor has kindly given me the following images of her father from her family collection.  Scroll to the end to see an article written by Pat Taylor.









[Colourised by John McCormick]


















[Colourised by John McCormick]


Possibly dressed in a hospital uniform
(this image was used by Northern Bank on their memorial)


Commercial Boat Club members with the Connor Cup



John Edwards Walsh (Sniper)

14th Battalion of the Royal Irish Rifles 36th Division.


One Sunday we were all coming out of Church together when my father met up with two ageing soldiers from the First World War.  One of them was J.W Harrip.  [Also a Northern Bank official].  They began to reminisce about old times and discovered that my mother and I didn’t know my father had been a hero and so they set about putting that to rights.

One night my Dad and several other soldiers had come under heavy rifle and shell fire while returning from a sortie in ‘No Man’s Land.’  When a count was taken it was discovered that his best friend was missing.  It was the decision of the officers that it would be foolhardy to attempt a rescue, ‘No hope in that Hell-fire,’ they declared.  However against all advice my Daddy had made his way back and found his pal very severely wounded but conscious.  Instant help was obviously needed, so he captured a German raiding party and forced the four soldiers to carry the wounded lad. back to the trenches.

The two old soldiers said he had steadfastly refused to have his name put forward for a medal, saying he had only done the usual day to day stuff. I almost burst with pride and thought my Dad was just amazing and was also particularly impressed by such modesty because he had never said a single word about it at home.

I had always known that he had been wounded at the Somme and still had two bullets in his back; he had let us feel them.  Fired from sideways on, they were surprisingly big and long, one being just a tiny fraction from his spine.  Later he was wounded again, it was either at Ypres or Messines where ever he was last. Pieces of shrapnel from an exploding shell went right through his leg at the ankle. He crawled into a captured German pill box and pulled himself on to some wooden boxes, but every time he lost consciousness his wounded limb slipped into the muddy flood water.  Eventually he was thrown on to a cart with dead men, but later, coming round, managed to attract attention.

He spent a year in hospital and had to argue vehemently with the doctors on a number of occasions as they were ‘hell bent’ on amputating his leg.  He was eventually able to return to Belfast, rejoin the Commercial Boat Club and win his third gold medal for rowing in a four.



ONLY THIS POEM - John E. Walsh 1888-1973


Main Street, Portrush 1950.
An unlikely place to discover
Dad was a First World War Hero.

He met with two old soldiers.
Surprised he’d not owned up, 
they painted us a picture.

Moonlit, on a sortie they’d come
under fire, fought their way back 
through the Somme’s hungry mud:

sodden, exhausted, their count showed
one short. Dad’s mate was missing. 
‘No hope in that hellfire,’ the officers decided.

Searching alone in ‘No Man s Land,’
Dad found him helpless, but aware.
Determined, he ambushed four Jerries,

forced them to carry his friend.
Despite all efforts he wouldn’t have
his name put forward for a medal. 

Even that day at the Port I felt the want.
I hanker for one still, to know it would be
handed down from old to young:

but there is only this poem.






Northern Whig dated 2nd May 1921 - part 1 - (courtesy of Nigel Henderson)



Northern Whig dated 2nd May 1921 - part 2 - (courtesy of Nigel Henderson)


Ferris, John Lindsay


Lieutenant John Lindsay Ferris
was born in Ballinamore on 13th April 1881.  He was the son of Robert Foster Ferris (bank clerk) and Maud Ferris.  In 1901, the family were living at 11 Eglantine Avenue; in 1911 they had moved to 232 Upper Newtownards Road, Belfast and in 1918 they had moved to 23 Rosemount Gardens, Belfast.  The family attended Fortwilliam Park Congregational Church. 
He joined Northern Bank on 14th August 1897 at Head Office – Secretary’s Department.  Transfers followed with Relief staff (1908) and Donegall Square (1912).  


Northern Banking Company, Donegall Square


On 12th March 1915, Ferris enlisted into the 18th Bn. RIR, aged 33, before being promoted to 2nd Lieutenant.  He was posted to the 12th Bn. Royal Irish Rifles and then transferred to the Machine-Gun Corps.  Ferris saw service with the British Expeditionary Force and was later promoted to Lieutenant.  He saw action in the Somme 1916 (Thiepval), Arras (Hindenburg Line) and the Allied advance 1918.  Demobilisation came on 22nd March 1919 and he was awarded the 1914/15 Star, the British Victory Medal and the British War Medal. 
Following demobilisation, Ferris rejoined the Northern Bank on 14th April 1919 in Head Office.  Transfers followed to Connswater Agency (1919), Head Office (1920), Ballynafeigh – manager (1921), Head Office (1931) and Shaftesbury Square (1940).  
He retired on 28th February 1941.
Ferris is commemorated on the Fortwilliam Park Congregational Church Roll of Honour. 

The Staff Magazine ‘The Link (August 1981)’ contains a photograph of Ferris in a 1913 Northern Bank Staff Golf outing.

Farquhar, John


Corporal John Farquhar
was born in Monkstown, Whiteabbey on 28th December 1881. 
On 17th May 1898, Farquhar joined Northern Bank.  Transfers followed with Ballybofey (1899), Newry (1903), Ballycarry (1903), Drumshanbo (1907) and Head Office (1909).  In 1911, Farquhar is boarding in house 7, Glenarm Road, Larne, Co. Antrim.  He describes himself as a Bank Official.  He was of Presbyterian faith. 
Whilst based in Head Office on 6th November 1915, aged 33, he enlisted into the 4th Bn. Royal Irish Fusiliers as a Private.  A posting to the 7th Bn. Royal Irish Fusiliers followed and he also served with the British Expeditionary Force.  He was subsequently promoted to Lance Corporal and then Corporal.  He saw action in Guillemont 1916.  He received a gunshot wound to the right leg.  Demobilisation came in November 1918 and he was awarded the British Victory Medal and the British War Medal. 
Following demobilisation, Farquhar rejoined the Northern Bank on 19th November 1918 at Head Office.  Transfers followed to Oldcastle (1919) and Dowra (1920) as Manager. 
He retired on 30th September 1921. 
He died in June 1954 aged 72.

Eakin, Herbert James


Lance Corporal Herbert James Eakin
was born in Bailieborough on 16th July 1897.  He was the son of Samuel Eakin and Essie Eakin.  In 1901 the family lived in house 2, Derrydamph, Skeagh, Co. Cavan.  By 1911, their property is known as house 1, Derrydamph, Skeagh, Co. Cavan.  He was of Presbyterian faith. 
On ‘Ulster Day’, Saturday, 28th September 1912, Eakin signed the Ulster Covenant at the 1st Presbyterian Church, Bailieborough. 
On 14th July 1915, Eakin joined Northern Bank at Head Office.  He was based in Keady branch on 11th December 1915 when he enlisted into the North Irish Horse as a Trooper aged 18.  Service was with the British Expeditionary Force.  Promotion to Lance Corporal followed.  Eakin saw action in Arras 1917, Ypres 1917, Cambrai 1917, Epey, Morval and Bapaume.  He was demobilised in February 1919 and was awarded the British Victory Medal and the British War Medal. 
After demobilisation, Eakin rejoined the Northern Bank on 11th March 1919 at Head Office.   Transfers followed to Limavady (1919), Kilrea (1920), Ballynafeigh (1921), Castlewellan (1922), Ball’s Branch (1926), Lisburn (1936), Donegall Square (1938, Lisburn (1942) and Hillsborough (1944). 


Northern Banking Company, Donegall Square


Cowan, William Percival Graham


Corporal William Percival Graham Cowan
was born in Bailieborough on 1st May 1897.  He was the son of William John and Emily Caroline Cowan.  In 1901 the family were living in house 17, Deramore Avenue, Belfast.  William is described as a Bank Cashier.  By 1911, they had moved to house 62, Main Street, Ballybay, Co. Monaghan.  He was of Church of Ireland faith.
On 14th April 1914, Cowan joined Northern Bank in Head office.  Transfers followed to Bailieborough (1914), Virginia (19150 and Ramelton (1915). 
Whilst based in Ramelton, Cowan volunteered for war service on 11th November 1915 (aged 18) into the 3rd Bn. Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers as a Private.  He saw service with the British Expeditionary Force, transferred to the North Irish Horse, thence the 9th Bn. Royal Irish Fusiliers.  He was posted to Cadet School, Ripon in 1918 and promoted to Corporal.  Cowan saw action in Cambrai 1917, Havincourt 1917 and with the Allied Advance 1918.  He was demobilised in February 1919 and was awarded the British Victory Medal and the British War Medal. 
Following demobilisation on 18th February 1919, he rejoined the Bank in Dungannon.  Transfers followed to Head Office – Stock & Coupon Department (1922), Shaftesbury Square (1931) and Irvinestown (1933). 

Craig, John Henry


John Henry Craig
was born on 12th April 1896.  He was the son of John and Susan Craig.  In 1901 the family lived in house 7, Kildare Street, Newry.  By 1911 the property is known as house 4, Kildare Street, Newry.  He was of Church of Ireland faith. 
On 29th May 1912 he joined Northern Bank at Head Office.  Transfers followed to Ballyclare (1912) and Head Office (1914).  
On ‘Ulster Day’, Saturday, 28th September 1912, Craig signed the Ulster Covenant at Newry Orange Hall. 
On 19th September 1914 he volunteered and enlisted into the Royal Irish Rifles for the duration of the war.  Craig was discharged from the Army on 25th May 1918. 

Clarke, John Carton


Private John Carton Clarke

was born on 2nd February 1897 and was of Presbyterian faith.

He was the son of William Thomas Clarke and Genna G M Clarke of Castlerock.  In 1901 the family were living in house 1, Castlerock, Freehall Watson Part of, Downhill, Co. Londonderry.  By 1911, the family address was recorded as house 4.1, Castlerock Town, Downhill, Co. Londonderry.  

On ‘Ulster Day’, Saturday, 28th September 1912, Clarke signed the Ulster Covenant at Articlave Orange Hall. 
In October 1914, Clarke joined Northern Bank at Carrickfergus.
In July 1916, Clarke volunteered and enlisted into the 9th Bn. Royal Fusiliers as a Private.  His unit is also recorded as 26th Royal Fusiliers.  His Army Number was 23278.

This website Carrickfergus Roll of Honour records Clarke as being in 9th Battalion - Royal Fusiliers - City of London Regiment.  This regiment was in the 18th (Eastern) Division involved in the attacks in October 1916 on the stubbornly defended and vital position of and around the Schwaben Redoubt.  On 7th October there was a determined counter-attack by the Germans to recapture the Redoubt.  It appears that Private Clarke was killed during this assault.  
Clarke went missing on 7th October 1916.  He is remembered in name on the Thiepval Memorial Pier and Face 8C, 9A and 16A.


He was awarded the British Victory Medal and the British War Medal. 

Gilmore, Alexander William Francis


2nd Lieutenant Alexander William Francis Gilmore (Gilmour) MC 
was born on 25th June 1898, the son of the late Isaiah Gibson Gilmore and Mary Jane Gilmore.  He was sometimes known as Alex.

In 1911 the family are living in house 3, Lear, Bailieborough, Co. Cavan. 12 year old Alex was living with his grand-father at house 67, Bailieborough spelling his surname as Gilmour.  He was of Church of Ireland faith.

On 3rd November 1914, Gilmore joined Northern Bank and worked in Head Office.

Alex volunteered in 1916 and enlisted into the Royal Irish Rifles (Cadet Company).  On promotion to 2nd Lieutenant he was posted to the 15th Bn. Royal Irish Rifles, British Expeditionary Force.  It is reported that he went 'to the front early in the present year [1917]'.

Gilmore fought in battles at Messines (1917) and Ypres (1917) before being killed in action on 23rd November 1917 aged 19.  He had first been reported as missing on 1st November 1917.
The Belfast News Letter dated 4th December 1917 reports:




Gilmore was awarded the British Victory Medal and the British War Medal and is commemorated on the Cambrai Memorial at Louverval.

The photograph of Gilmore on the Bank Roll of Honour details him as being awarded the Military Cross (MC).  He received the MC for his gallantry at the capture of Messines Ridge in June 1916.


A BBC Newsline website describes a 'Song of the 19th RIR Cadets'.  It describes how the lyrics of a song were written to '... give an insight into the everyday lives of the young cadets who were billeted to the Co. Down town duriing the First World War ...'.  43 names of cadets were mentioned in the song and the author of the article believes that Gilmore was 2nd Lt A W F Gilmore.
The lyrics are detailed in this link whilst the actual verse mentioning Gilmore is transcribed here:

Now, speaking of ladies, a tale I’ve been told,
Of how Sammy and Gilmore and Pollin were sold,
With officers swanky their sweethearts now walk,
But the three that I’ve named do nothing but talk,
They say what they’ll do if they once get the chance,
But the ladies concerned don’t deign them a glance,
Tis a pity to rupture the sweet harmonie,
Where the mountains of Mourne sweep down the sea.



Wilson, Henry Pringle Malcomson


2nd Lieutenant Henry Pringle Malcomson Wilson
was born in Belfast on 20th August 1888.  He was the son of George and Mary Sophia Wilson.  In 1901, the family are living in house 18, The Diamond, Coleraine, Co. Londonderry.  George describes his occupation as a Branch Bank Manager. 
On 11th April 1905, Wilson joined Northern Bank at Head Office.   Transfers followed to Whitehead (1911) and Royal Avenue (1912).  


In 1911, Wilson was boarding in house 39, Rugby Road, Cromac Ward, Belfast.  He is described as a Bank Official and was of Presbyterian faith.
On 12th February 1916, whilst based in Royal Avenue, he volunteered and enlisted into the Honourable Artillery Coy (Infantry) as a Private aged 27.  He served in the British Expeditionary Force and was promoted to Sergeant in 1917 before being gazetted as a 2nd Lieutenant in the Royal Warwickshire Regiment.  Wilson saw service at Serre 1917, Bullecourt 1917, Malplaquet 1918 and the Allied Advance 1918.  

Demobilisation came in March 1919.  He was awarded the British Victory Medal and the British War Medal. 
Following demobilisation, Wilson rejoined the Northern Bank on 1st April 1919 at Royal Avenue.  Transfers followed to Ballymoney (1923), Magherafelt (1933), Ballynahinch (1938) and Shaftesbury Square (1944). 

The Campbell College Register of Lennon Wylie records Wilson, Henry Pringle Malcolmson, b. 20th August, 1888, son of Geo. Wilson, 58 South Parade, Belfast. L.V, Dec., 1904. Bank Official. Great War: H.A.C., 2nd Lieut., 1918. Manager, Northern Bank, Magherafelt; Manager, Northern Bank, Ballynahinch, (1938-44); Manager, Shaftesbury Square, Belfast, 1944-50. Retired, 1950. Address: 30 Kensington Park, Bangor, Co. Down. (M.q.)

Acknowledgements to lennonwylie.

He retired on 31st May 1950.
Wilson died on 2nd August 1977. 
The Staff Magazine ‘The Link (August 1981)’ contains a photograph of Wilson in a 1913 Northern Bank Staff Golf outing.

Wilson, Frederick Charles


Frederick Charles Wilson
was born on 29th March 1896 and from Knowehead, Ballyclare. He was of Presbyterian faith.
On ‘Ulster Day’, Saturday, 28th September 1912, Wilson signed the Ulster Covenant at Ballyclare. 
On 3rd June 1913 he joined Northern Bank at Royal Avenue.  In the same year he was transferred to Head Office and then Drumshanbo. 
In 1915, whilst in Drumshanbo, he volunteered and enlisted into the Royal Dublin Fusiliers aged 19. 
Following demobilisation, he rejoined the Northern Bank on 2nd March 1919.  Transfers followed to Claudy (1920), Londonderry (1922), Beragh (1922) and Head Office (1923). 

Northern Banking Company Limited, Londonderry


White, Frederick William


2nd Lieutenant Frederick William White
was born in Belfast on 19th June 1876.  He was the son of William and Elizabeth White.  In 1901, White was living in house 37, Clifton Road, Bangor, Co. Down.   He was of Church of Ireland faith. 
On 1st November 1907, White joined Northern Bank at Head Office as a Solicitor.  In 1911, the family property is now described as house 79, Clifton Road, Bangor.  White describes his occupation as a Solicitor. 
On 6th January 1917, he volunteered and enlisted into the Royal Garrison Artillery aged 41.  His Staff Record Card records his unit as the Inns of Court Officer Training Corps (OTC).  He was gazetted as a 2nd Lieutenant into the Royal Garrison Artillery and went on to serve in the British Expeditionary Force.  White saw service at St. Quentin 1918 and Courtrai 1918 before being demobilised in February 1919.  He was awarded the British Victory Medal and the British War Medal. 
He rejoined the Northern Bank on 3rd March 1919 at Head Office and was appointed as a Director on 1st March 1929. 
He retired on 1st February 1945. 

Watkinson, Henry Siddle


Henry Siddle Watkinson
was born on 22nd April 1898.  He was the son of Richard and Elizabeth Watkinson.  In 1901, the family are living in house 93, Madrid Street, Pottinger Ward, Belfast.  By 1911, the family have moved to house 58, The Mount, Ormeau Ward, Belfast. 
On ‘Ulster Day’, Saturday, 28th September 1912, Elsie and Robert (sister and brother of Henry) signed the Women’s Declaration and the Ulster Covenant at St Clements Parish Church and the City Hall, Belfast respectively. 
On 7th July 1915, Watkinson joined Northern Bank at Head Office.  Whilst based in Head Office he volunteered and enlisted into the Royal Army Service Corps (Mec. Transport) (RASC).   He moved to the 3rd Bn. Leinster Regiment before being demobilised in January 1919. 
Following demobilisation he rejoined Northern Bank on 10th February 1919.  Transfers followed to Grafton Street (1926), Head Office (1926), Royal Avenue (1929), Armagh (1936), Downpatrick (1940), Fivemiletown (1947) and Dromore (1950). 



Northern Banking Company Limited, Downpatrick

He retired on 31st January 1961 and died in 1973. 
Mrs I Watkinson, the widow of H S Watkinson attended the 2000 re-dedication ceremony of the Rolls of Honour. 
The Staff Magazine ‘The Link (August 1980)’ contains a photograph of Watkinson in Royal Avenue branch in 1930.

Stewart, James Maxwell

James Maxwell Stewart

was born on 2nd January 1899.  

He was the son of William Stewart and Jeannie S Stewart.  

In 1901 and 1911 the family were living in house 47, Fountain Street, Antrim.  He was of Presbyterian faith. 

In 1915 he joined Northern Bank at Head Office.  A transfer to Cushendall (1916) followed. 

In 1917, Stewart volunteered and enlisted for service. 

Stewart, Isaac Irwin


Sergeant Isaac Irwin Stewart
was born on 4th February 1890.  He was the son of George and Margaret A Stewart.  In 1901 the family lived in house 42, Ballyness, Gelvin, Co. Londonderry.  He was of Presbyterian faith. 
On 8th April 1908, he joined Northern Bank at Head Office.  Transfers followed to Bray (1908), Head Office (1909) and Coleraine (1910).  In 1911, Stewart was boarding in house 29, Railway Road, Coleraine, Co. Londonderry.  He is described as a Bank Official. 
Further transfers followed to Head Office (1914), Royal Avenue (1914) and Beragh (1914). 
Whilst based in Beragh, he volunteered and enlisted into the 14th Bn. Royal Irish Rifles as a Private for the duration of the war.  He may also have served in the Young Citizen Volunteers (11th Bn. RIR).  He served in the British Expeditionary Force before being posted to the 19th (Res.) Royal Irish Rifles.  Later he was promoted to Sergeant.  Service was seen in the Somme 1916 (Thiepval).  Stewart was injured once; a gunshot wound to the right hand and right leg.  Demobilisation came in February 1919.  

He was awarded the 1914/15 Star, the British Victory Medal and the British War Medal. 
Following demobilisation, Stewart rejoined the Northern Bank on 10th February 1919 at Head Office.  Transfers followed to Shaftesbury Square (1921), Ballybay (1926), Donegall Square (1928), Fintona (1936) and Newry – manager (1941). 



Northern Banking Company, Donegall Square

Taylor, Cyril William


Trooper Cyril William Taylor
was born in Belfast on 23rd November 1898.  His address is house 4, Copeland Terrace, Carrickfergus.   He was of Church of Ireland faith. 
On 12th January 1915, he joined Northern Bank at Head Office. 
Whilst based in Head Office, he volunteered and enlisted into the North Irish Horse as a Trooper aged 17.  He moved to the Royal Garrison Artillery before being demobilised in January 1919. 
Following demobilisation, Taylor rejoined the Northern Bank on 10th February 1919 at Head Office.  Transfers followed to Dromore (1923), Coleraine (1925), Kilrea (1937) and Lisburn – sub-manager (1944). 
Taylor retired on 31st December 1959.
Derek Taylor, a descendent of C W Taylor attended the 2000 re-dedication ceremony of the Rolls of Honour.

Ross, John Alexander


Trooper John Alexander Ross
was born in Islandmagee on 15th June 1893.  

He was the son of Thomas Ross and Annie Ross.  In 1901, the family lived in house 32, Gransha, Islandmagee, Co. Antrim.  He was of Methodist faith. 
On 13th December 1910 Ross joined Northern Bank at Head Office.  Transfers followed to Bray (1911) and Ball’s Branch (1914).  By 1911, Ross is still living with his family in Islandmagee.  His occupation is recorded as a Bank Clerk. 
On ‘Ulster Day’, Saturday, 28th September 1912, Ross signed the Ulster Covenant at Islandmagee Orange Hall giving his address as Mullaghboy. 
Ross volunteered and enlisted on 7th December 1915, aged 22, into the North Irish Horse as a Trooper.  He served with the British Expeditionary Force before transferring to the Royal Irish Fusiliers.  Service was seen in Messines 1917, Cambrai 1917, St. Quentin 1918 and Bailleul 1918.  Ross was injured 4 times; a gunshot wound to the right arm, a gunshot wound to the arm, a gunshot wound to the left leg before becoming permanently disabled.  Demobilisation came on 14th March 1919.  He was awarded the British Victory Medal and the British War Medal. 
Following demobilisation, Ross rejoined the Northern Bank on 2nd June 1919 at Head Office.  Transfers followed to Portaferry (1920), Lurgan (1926) and Markets – pro-manager (1934). 
On 2nd January 1940, Ross died suddenly.

Robertson, George Edward


Cadet George Edward Robertson
was born in Waterford on 22nd June 1882.  He was the son of Mary Robertson and of Methodist faith. 
On 9th April 1901 Robertson joined Northern Bank at Ball’s Branch.  In 1904, he was transferred to Grafton Street.  In 1911, Robertson is residing at house 13, Claremont, Drumcondra, Dublin.  He is described as a Bank Official. 
Whilst in Grafton Street, he volunteered and enlisted into the Dublin University Officer Training Corps (OTC) as a Cadet.  He was discharged from the forces on 23rd September 1918. 
Following his discharge, he rejoined the Northern Bank on 21st October 1918 at Ball’s Branch.  Transfers followed to Grafton Street (1919), Boyle (1925), Southern (1927) and Ball’s Branch (1928). 
Robertson retired on 30th April 1946 and died on 21st July 1954. 
The Staff Magazine ‘The Link (Summer 1986)’ contains a photograph of Robertson in a 1936 Northern Bank Staff Golf outing.

Morrow, Louis Hamilton


Louis Hamilton Morrow
was born on 2nd January 1891.

Morrow joined Northern Bank on 20th July 1908 at Head Office.   He was of Church of Ireland faith.  
Transfers follow with Ballymena (1908), Head Office (1909), Armagh (1909) and Clones (1911).  By 1911, Morrow is boarding in house 39, Whitehall, Clones Upper, Co. Monaghan.  He is recorded as a Bank Clerk. 


Northern Banking Company, Ballymena
 

On ‘Ulster Day’, Saturday, 28th September 1912, a Lewis Morrow signed the Ulster Covenant at Clones Orange Hall.

Morrow aged 24, whilst based in Clones volunteered and enlisted into the Public School Corps on 11th January 1915.  He saw service with the British Expeditionary Force, the Somme in 1916 (Beaumont-Hamel) and in Arras 1917. 

He received 3 gunshot wounds in separate incidents injuring his knee, arm and face. 

Demobilisation came in December 1917 when he was invalided out. 

He was awarded the 1914/15 Star, the British Victory Medal and the British War Medal.

Following demobilisation, Morrow rejoined the Bank at Head Office on 2nd January 1918.  Transfers followed with Clones (1918), Head Office (1918), Portaferry (1918), Newtownstewart (1920), Ballynahinch (1926), Raphoe (1930), Irvinestown (1933) and Randalstown (1940).

Moore, William Robert


2nd Lieutenant William Robert Moore
was born in Glengormley on 28th March 1890.  He was the son of William and Lily Moore.  In 1901 the family were living in house 12, Chestnut Gardens, Clifton Ward, Belfast.  He was of Church of Ireland faith.
Moore joined Northern Bank on 2nd April 1906 at Head Office.   In 1911, Moore was living in house 23, Alliance Avenue, Clifton Ward, Belfast.  He is recorded as a Bank Clerk.  Transfers followed with Royal Avenue (1911), Head Office (1914), Southern (1914), Skerries (1915) and Grafton Street (1917). 
Whilst in Grafton Street, aged 28, Moore volunteered and enlisted on 22nd April 1918 into the Dublin University Officer Training Corps (OTC) as a Cadet.  He served with the 17th O.C. Bn. at Rhyl Cotford, Catterick before being gazetted as a 2nd Lieutenant in the Royal Irish Fusiliers.  Demobilisation came in February 1919.  In 1919 he married a Miss Irvine of Dublin. 
Following demobilisation, Moore rejoined the Northern Bank on 19th March 1919 at Grafton Street.  Transfers followed to Ball’s Branch (1921), Kingscourt (1922), Clones (1925), Ballynafeigh (1931) and Markets – Manager (1945). 
The Staff Magazine ‘The Link (Summer 1986)’ contains a photograph of Moore in a 1936 Northern Bank Staff Golf outing.

Millikin, William Hamilton Graham


Trooper William Hamilton Graham Millikin
was born 18th February 1897. 

He was the son of James Millikin and Celicia (or Alina) Margaret Millikin.  In 1901 the family lived in house 21, Drumharvey, Co. Tyrone.  James was a Bank Cashier.  Wm was not recorded on the 1901 census form for this address although he would have been aged 4.  A sister, Marion (aged 2) is recorded.

In 1911 the family lived in house 13, Marsden Gardens, Clifton Ward, Belfast.  The father is still a Bank Cashier.  The family consists of James, Cecilia, Elizabeth (16), William (14), Marion (12) and Kathleen (11).

On ‘Ulster Day’, Saturday, 28th September 1912, Millikin’s father signed the Ulster Covenant at the Old Town Hall, Belfast. 
On 16th March 1914, Millikin joined Northern Bank in Head Office.  He was of Church of Ireland faith. 
Whilst based in Head Office, aged 18, he volunteered and enlisted into the North Irish Horse as a Trooper.  He joined the British Expeditionary Force transferring into the 9th Bn. Royal Irish Fusiliers.  He received 2 gunshot wounds during his service.  Demobilisation came in December 1918.  He was awarded the British Victory Medal and the British War Medal. 
Following demobilisation, Millikin rejoined the Northern Bank on 15th January 1919 at Royal Avenue.  Transfers followed with Ballinamore (1920), Donegall Square (1922), Head Office (1923), Crumlin Road (1924), Knock Sub-branch ((1924), Irvinestown(1932), Shaftesbury Square (1933), Falls (1936), Lisburn (1937), Shankill Road (1941) and Irvinestown – manager (1945). 


Northern Banking Company, Donegall Square


Another image of Millikin in this link:

Northern Bank Golf Outing - May 1951