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Wednesday, 30 January 2013

McIlwaine, James Condy


Company Sergeant Major (CSM) James Condy McIlwaine
was born in Ballymacarret, Belfast on 30th July 1891.

He was the son of James McIlwaine and Annie McIlwaine (nee Condy).  They had married on 15th May 1890 at Great Victoria Street Presbyterian Church.

In 1901 the family are recorded as living in house 123, West Division, Carrickfergus, Co. Antrim.  He was of Presbyterian faith being a member of Joymount Presbyterian Church.

On 5th December 1907 McIlwaine joined Northern Bank at Head Office.  Transfers followed with Fintona (1908), Oldcastle (1911), Grafton Street (1913), Head Office (1913) and Coleraine (1913). 

By 1911, the family have moved to house 8, North Street, Carrickfergus, Co. Antrim. James is recorded as a Bank Official.

On ‘Ulster Day’, Saturday, 28th September 1912, McIlwaine signed the Ulster Covenant at Carrickfergus Court House.

Whilst in Coleraine, McIlwaine aged 21 volunteered and enlisted on 15th September 1914 into the 12th Bn. Royal Irish Rifles (RIR) as a Private.  His Service Number was 12/18305.

He joined the British Expeditionary Force and was promoted first to Lance Corporal and then to Corporal. Service was seen in the Somme 1916, Messines 1917, Ypres 1917 (Langemarck), St. Quentin 1918, Mesines 1918 (Kemmel) and then the Allied Advance 1918.

Demobilisation came in February 1918.  He was awarded the 1914/15 Star, the British Victory Medal and the British War Medal.

Following demobilisation, McIlwaine rejoined the Northern Bank on 1st April 1919 at Donegall Square. Transfers followed to Crumlin Road (1920), Coleraine (1922), Boyle (1927), Oldcastle (1933), Head Office – Inspector and Head Office – Assistant Chief Cashier (1941).


Northern Banking Company, Donegall Square


McIlwaine is named on the Roll of Honour in the New Row, Coleraine Presbyterian Church.  He is also recorded on this website Carrickfergus Roll of Honour. where he is recorded as achieving the rank of Company Sergeant Major.  The site also records him as being taken prisoner at the Somme in July 1916.

In early 1919, James married.  The records in Ancestry record three women present:  Mary Courtney. Lizzie McGee and Agnes Manson.  It is unclear which was the fiance.


Fryar, William Leonard


Lieutenant William Leonard Fryar
was born in Banbridge on 12th June 1894. 

He was the son of Samuel Fryar BA and Letitia Elizabeth Fryar.  In 1901 the family were living in house 86, Scarva Street, Banbridge.  By 1911 the property was known as house 65, Scarva Street, Banbridge. 
On 23rd August 1911, Fryar joined Northern Bank in Head Office.  He was of Church of Ireland faith.  Transfers followed with Castlewellan (1913), Head Office (1913) and Clones (1914). 

On ‘Ulster Day’, Saturday, 28th September 1912, Clarke signed the Ulster Covenant at Banbridge Orange Hall giving his address as Primrose Villa, Banbridge.   
Whilst based in Clones branch, on 1st January 1915, aged 21, Fryar volunteered and enlisted into the Royal Naval Aviation Service (Armoured Cars).  He was gazetted as a 2nd Lieutenant with the 17th Bn. Royal Irish Rifles, transferred into the Machine-Gun Corps, serving with the British Expeditionary Force eventually being promoted to Lieutenant. 

The Belfast News Letter of 30th October 1916 reports:




The Northern Banking Company 1924 Centenary Volume describes him as a Petty Officer. 
Further action was seen in the Somme 1916, Ypres 1917 and Cambrai 1917 before being demobilised in January 1919.  Fryar was awarded the British Victory Medal and the British War Medal. 
Following demobilisation, he rejoined the Northern Bank at Head Office on 17th February 1919.  He was transferred to Royal Avenue in the same year, Donegall Square (1927), Dungloe (1928), Bangor (1933) and Omagh (1941).  


Northern Banking Company, Donegall Square

In 1919, he married a Miss Taylor who also worked in Royal Avenue branch.   They had 3 children, one surviving and living in Switzerland and well into his 80's.

The Campbell College Register of Lennon Wylie records Fryar, John Leonard Hamilton (C), b. 17th February, 1934, son of W. L. Fryar, Northern Bank House, Omagh. U.VI, July, 1951. Scholar. Modern Languages Sizar, T.C.D., 1951. Address: Northern Bank House, Omagh, Co. Tyrone.

Acknowledgements to lennonwylie.

On 26th March 1922, Seapatrick Parish Church honoured the dead of the Great War with the dedication of a stained glass window. Around 200 ex-servicemen paraded with Lieutenant W L Fryar amongst other officers. 

MacBride, Thompson Gamble


2nd Lieutenant Thompson Gamble MacBride
was born in 1896.

He was the son of Joseph MacBride and Phoebe MacBride. In 1911 the family are living in house 32, Knock Road, Pottinger Ward, Belfast.

On 28th September 1912, MacBride signed the Ulster Covenant at the Old Town Hall, Belfast giving his address as Beacon Field, Knock, Belfast.

Following his education at Campbell College, MacBride would have joined the Belfast Banking Company around 1913.

MacBride served with Queen's University Officer Traing Corps before joining the Royal Irish Fusiliers and attaining the rank of Lieutenant.

The Belfast News Letter of 13th Novemeber 1915 reports:




He worked in Head Office and Newtownards.

Osborough, William Thomas


Sergeant William Thomas Osborough

was born in 1895.

He was the son of Andrew Osborough and Margaret Osborough.   They married in 1892 in 1st Holywood Presbyterian Church. 

In 1901, the family were living in house 169.1 Garvagh, Co. Londonderry.  In 1910, a Sergeant (Andrew) Osborough is recorded as being in charge of Portstewart Royal Irish Constabulary station. 

See more on Andrew Osborough below.

By 1911 the family had moved to house 49.1 Coleraine Road, Portstewart. They were recorded under the surname 'Oborough'.

In 1911 William Thomas Osborough is recorded as boarding in house 13, Infirmary Road, East Side (Monpelier Hill). (Arran Quay, Dublin).   His occupation is a Civil Service Clerk (Boy Clerk Irish Land Commission).

On 28th September 1912, Osborough signed the Ulster Covenant at the City Hall, Belfast.

Osborough would have joined the Belfast Banking Company by 1911 / 1912 working in Lurgan.



Belfast Banking Company, Lurgan branch


During the Great War, Osborough served with the 10th Royal Irish Fusiliers. Osborough served with the 11th Bn. Royal Irish Fusiliers and attained the rank of Sergeant.

The Belfast News Letter of 17th November 1915 reports:




The National Archives records a Medal Index Card as follows:

Royal Irish Fusiliers, 22758, Sergeant.  He was awarded the British War Medal and the Victory Medal.

Following his demobilisation after the Great War, Osborough returned to work. 

He is remembered on the Roll of Honour in Holywood Presbyterian Church.

There is also a W T Osborough detailed on the WW2 Roll of Honour in Glendermott Presbyterian Church, Altnagelvin, Londonderry.  I have no record of Wm Thomas Osborough serving in WW2; his age would have been between 44 and 50.




In 1931 he was Worshipful Master in the Freedom Masonic Lodge No. 394, The Mount, Belfast.

Osborough was a member of the Belfast Banking Company Sports Club on 26th March 1945 paying 5 shillings subscription.   He also served in South End and Western branches.   Osborough is recorded in the 1956 annual accounts of the Belfast Banking Company as being manager of Bangor branch.

Retirement came in 1957.

The Staff Magazine ‘The Link (Summer 1984)’ contains a photograph of Osborough in a 1947 Belfast Banking Company Cricket Team.


Sergeant Andrew Osborough (Royal Irish Constabulary)

ROYAL IRISH CONSTABULARY—CONSTABLE OSBOROUGH, CO. DOWN.
HC Deb 04 April 1887 vol 313 cc360-1360
MR. M'CARTAN (Down, S.)

asked the Chief Secretary to the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, Whether Constable Osborough, Royal Irish Constabulary, when stationed at Holywood, County Down, was twice reported for neglect of duty, and was, on the recommendation of the District-Inspector, transferred to another station; whether a memorial was received by the County Inspector of Down, from magistrates of the district, asking for the return of Osborough to Holywood station; whether, on this memorial having been forwarded to Dublin Castle, the Inspector General directed that Osborough should be sent back to Holywood; and, whether this action of the Inspector General is in accordance with the practice always followed in such cases?
THE CHIEF SECEETAEY (Mr. A. J. BALFOUR)(Manchester, E.)

I am informed that no complaint or report was made against this constable, but that the County Inspector had given an order which led to his transfer, and that the magistrates at Holywood asked that he should be sent back on the ground of his good conduct, local knowledge, and good service, and the County Inspector complied. The matter was in the discretion of the County Inspector, and was not referred to the Inspector General.

Turpin, Aubrey Lawrence


2nd Lieutenant Aubrey Lawrence Turpin
was born in 1892. 

He was the son of Thomas Digby Turpin and Jane Turpin.  In 1901 the family are living in house 1, Lawn View Place, Ballymena.  The father is described as a Bank Cashier. 
Turpin would have joined the Belfast Banking Company around 1909. 

By 1911 the family had moved to house 39, High Street, Portadown.  Thomas’ occupation is now Bank Manager and Aubrey’s occupation is described as a Bank Assistant. 
Turpin served with the 19th Bn. Royal Irish Rifles and attained the rank of 2nd Lieutenant.

The Belfast News Letter of 14th December 1915 reports:




The National Archives records a Medal Index Card as follows:

Royal Irish Rifles, 2nd Lieutenant


He later had a daughter, Doreen Elizabeth Turpin.

Milligan, Frederick Albert Woods





2nd Lieutenant Frederick Albert Woods Milligan
was born in 1897 in Canada.

He was the son of the late William George Milligan and Elizabeth Milligan, of Ballymascanlon, Co. Louth.

In 1901 the family were living with a Jane McKenney in house 2, Culfore, Ballymascanlon.   Jane is described as the head of family.  William George Milligan and his two children are living with McKenney.

By 1911 Milligan is recorded as boarding in house 24, Drumcar, Co. Louth.  

Following his education at the Educational Institute, Dundalk, Milligan joined the Belfast Banking Company and served in Enniskillen and Drogheda branches.

A relation or family friend may have been the Honourable Gertrude Plunkett (*) of Ballymascanlon House, Dundalk. 

Milligan volunteered and enlisted into the Leinster Regiment to undertake his training.  His Service Number was 7/2205.

He was serving with the 7th Bn. Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers as a 2nd Lieutenant when he was killed in action on 29th April 1916 aged 19.   Milligan is buried in the Philosphe British Cemetery, Mazingarbe, Pas De Calais, France.   

The Belfast News Letter of 11th May1916 reports:





(*) Gertrude (1841-1924) was an Irish aristocrat from Co. Louth.   She was one of six children to Thomas Plunket (1792-1866) a junior Church of Ireland Clergyman who later became the Bishop of Tuam, Killala and Achonry and after his father died became the 2nd Baron Plunket.   Her mother was Louise Jane Foster of Fanevalley, Co. Louth and MP for Dunleer.   She was the granddaughter of William Plunket, Lord Chancellor of Ireland, who became the first Baron Plunket.   Gertrude lived with her sister, Katherine who inherited from her mother one of the family’s ancestral homes, Ballymascanlon House, near Dundalk.




Administration of the estate was granted at Armagh to Susan V McKenney, Spinster.  Milligan's effects were £81 14s 8d.



Milligan is also remembered on the Drogheda War Memorial.  My thanks to John McCormick of the facebook group 'War graves & memorials, Northern Ireland' for the following photograph.





Campbell, Samuel MacDonnell


2nd Lieutenant Samuel MacDonnell Campbell

was born on 16th October 1882.

He was the son of Mr R M Campbell and Mrs Campbell of Dungiven, Co. Londonderry.  The family were of Church of Ireland faith.
On 26th March 1900 he joined Northern Bank at Head Office.  His address at that time is recorded as Dungiven.
In 1901 Campbell was boarding in house 59, Atlantic Avenue, Belfast.  He is described as a Bank Official.  Transfers followed his spell in Head Office with moves to Limavady (1903), Coleraine (1906), Larne (1910) and Head Office (1915).  By 1911, he was boarding in house 53, Main Street, Larne, Co. Antrim and describing himself as a Banker. 

On ‘Ulster Day’, Saturday, 28th September 1912, Campbell signed the Ulster Covenant at Articlave Orange Hall. 
On 10th May 1915, Campbell volunteered and enlisted into the 13th Bn. Lancashire Fusiliers as a 2nd Lieutenant.  He was later attached to the 86th Trench Mortar Battery. 
Campbell was killed in action on 1st July 1916.   He is buried in the Beaumont-Hamel British Cemetery, Somme, France.

The Belfast News Letter of 11th July 1916 reports:




Another newspaper reported:




Campbell was awarded the British Victory Medal and the British War Medal. 


Probate was granted at Dublin on 2nd October 1916 to Martin Richards, Dentist.  Campbell's effects totalled £194 18s 9d.